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Each piece on this album, titled Undine, takes inspiration from fairy tales, myths and poems. These works perfectly represent the hidden symbolism and fervent romanticism of this period, and the aura of magic and allure they emanate is undeniable. Alongside the more well-known pieces by Debussy, Reinecke and Mouquet, Undine features a piece by the almost forgotten composer Albert Doyen (1882-1935), whose music blends perfectly into the context of this poetic journey. Reinecke is largely known for his flute music, which spans the 19th century, although his music still reveals the influence of the first German Romantics. Reinecke was inspired to write Undine Sonata after reading Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué's eponymous fairy tale, which suited the German Romantics' penchant for the supernatural. The fairy tale describes the water-nymph Undine's search for earthly love, and each of the four movements evokes a precise moment in the story. Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, inspired by symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé's L'Après-midi d'un faune, was written for full orchestra. Enraptured by the intensely sensual atmosphere of Mallarmé's poetry, Debussy's interpretation overflows with passion and exuberance. In this piece Debussy shows how the expressions of the soul can be transformed into sounds and beauty, offering glimpses of wonderment as well as myriad splashes of color. Inspired by the Debussian style, Albert Doyen wrote five Poèmes grecs. The use of whole-tone harmonies and the attention to fleeting, subtle sonorities are reminiscent of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi. However, following the publication of Poèmes Grecs, the young composer fell into complete obscurity. Also influenced by Greek mythology is Mouquet's best-loved work, La Flûte de Pan. Mouquet's sonata presents three tableaux of the Greek god Pan: Pan and the shepherds, Pan and the birds, and Pan and the nymphs.
Each piece on this album, titled Undine, takes inspiration from fairy tales, myths and poems. These works perfectly represent the hidden symbolism and fervent romanticism of this period, and the aura of magic and allure they emanate is undeniable. Alongside the more well-known pieces by Debussy, Reinecke and Mouquet, Undine features a piece by the almost forgotten composer Albert Doyen (1882-1935), whose music blends perfectly into the context of this poetic journey. Reinecke is largely known for his flute music, which spans the 19th century, although his music still reveals the influence of the first German Romantics. Reinecke was inspired to write Undine Sonata after reading Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué's eponymous fairy tale, which suited the German Romantics' penchant for the supernatural. The fairy tale describes the water-nymph Undine's search for earthly love, and each of the four movements evokes a precise moment in the story. Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, inspired by symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé's L'Après-midi d'un faune, was written for full orchestra. Enraptured by the intensely sensual atmosphere of Mallarmé's poetry, Debussy's interpretation overflows with passion and exuberance. In this piece Debussy shows how the expressions of the soul can be transformed into sounds and beauty, offering glimpses of wonderment as well as myriad splashes of color. Inspired by the Debussian style, Albert Doyen wrote five Poèmes grecs. The use of whole-tone harmonies and the attention to fleeting, subtle sonorities are reminiscent of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi. However, following the publication of Poèmes Grecs, the young composer fell into complete obscurity. Also influenced by Greek mythology is Mouquet's best-loved work, La Flûte de Pan. Mouquet's sonata presents three tableaux of the Greek god Pan: Pan and the shepherds, Pan and the birds, and Pan and the nymphs.
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Each piece on this album, titled Undine, takes inspiration from fairy tales, myths and poems. These works perfectly represent the hidden symbolism and fervent romanticism of this period, and the aura of magic and allure they emanate is undeniable. Alongside the more well-known pieces by Debussy, Reinecke and Mouquet, Undine features a piece by the almost forgotten composer Albert Doyen (1882-1935), whose music blends perfectly into the context of this poetic journey. Reinecke is largely known for his flute music, which spans the 19th century, although his music still reveals the influence of the first German Romantics. Reinecke was inspired to write Undine Sonata after reading Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué's eponymous fairy tale, which suited the German Romantics' penchant for the supernatural. The fairy tale describes the water-nymph Undine's search for earthly love, and each of the four movements evokes a precise moment in the story. Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, inspired by symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé's L'Après-midi d'un faune, was written for full orchestra. Enraptured by the intensely sensual atmosphere of Mallarmé's poetry, Debussy's interpretation overflows with passion and exuberance. In this piece Debussy shows how the expressions of the soul can be transformed into sounds and beauty, offering glimpses of wonderment as well as myriad splashes of color. Inspired by the Debussian style, Albert Doyen wrote five Poèmes grecs. The use of whole-tone harmonies and the attention to fleeting, subtle sonorities are reminiscent of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi. However, following the publication of Poèmes Grecs, the young composer fell into complete obscurity. Also influenced by Greek mythology is Mouquet's best-loved work, La Flûte de Pan. Mouquet's sonata presents three tableaux of the Greek god Pan: Pan and the shepherds, Pan and the birds, and Pan and the nymphs.
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