Swipe

iye

Three late 70s Capitol Albums by Raul de Souza: 'Sweet Lucy' (1977), 'Don't Ask My Neighbors' (1978) and 'Til Tomorrow Comes' (1979) available in a double CD package, with additional bonus tracks. Unquestionably a giant of Brazilian music, whose mastery of the trombone placed him in the instrument's elite. Featured tracks to check out on this package include 'Sweet Lucy', 'Overture', 'Daisy Mae', 'Jump Street' and 'Don't Ask My Neighbors' to name but five. With sleeve notes by MOJO and Record Collector journalist Charles Waring. Born Joao José Pereira de Souza in Rio de Janeiro on 23 August 1934, Raul de Souza played with the legendary Brazilian composer and bandleader Pixinguinha at the age of 17 in 1951 and, a year later, performed with Agostinho dos Santos, a popular singer who later had a role in the burgeoning bossa nova movement of the late 1950s. Encouraged by his friend percussionist Airto Moreira and his wife, singer Flora Purim, Raul left Brazil for the USA in the early 70s. In 1976, he contributed to an album by a US-based Latin fusion group called Caldera, which was released on Capitol Records and put him in the orbit of it's executive producer Larkin Arnold. For Raul's debut LP, 'Sweet Lucy', Arnold paired him with the capable George Duke, a jazz musician with a deep appreciation of Brazilian music who was just beginning to branch out as a record producer. Raul also worked with George Duke in 1978 on the follow-up album, 'Don't Ask My Neighbors', although Duke is credited under the alias Dawilli Gonga. George Duke vacated the producer's chair for the third Capitol Album 'Til Tomorrow Comes' to be replaced by Arthur G. Wright, a prolific guitarist, songwriter, arranger and producer from Los Angeles whose credits ranged from Diana Ross to Linda Ronstadt. He surrounded Raul with some of LA's best session musicians including keyboardist Greg Phillinganes, saxophonist Ernie Fields, guitarist David T. Walker and drummers Ed Greene and James Gadson - and concocted a different musical backdrop for the trombonist; one that tapped more heavily into disco and R&B rather than jazz.
Three late 70s Capitol Albums by Raul de Souza: 'Sweet Lucy' (1977), 'Don't Ask My Neighbors' (1978) and 'Til Tomorrow Comes' (1979) available in a double CD package, with additional bonus tracks. Unquestionably a giant of Brazilian music, whose mastery of the trombone placed him in the instrument's elite. Featured tracks to check out on this package include 'Sweet Lucy', 'Overture', 'Daisy Mae', 'Jump Street' and 'Don't Ask My Neighbors' to name but five. With sleeve notes by MOJO and Record Collector journalist Charles Waring. Born Joao José Pereira de Souza in Rio de Janeiro on 23 August 1934, Raul de Souza played with the legendary Brazilian composer and bandleader Pixinguinha at the age of 17 in 1951 and, a year later, performed with Agostinho dos Santos, a popular singer who later had a role in the burgeoning bossa nova movement of the late 1950s. Encouraged by his friend percussionist Airto Moreira and his wife, singer Flora Purim, Raul left Brazil for the USA in the early 70s. In 1976, he contributed to an album by a US-based Latin fusion group called Caldera, which was released on Capitol Records and put him in the orbit of it's executive producer Larkin Arnold. For Raul's debut LP, 'Sweet Lucy', Arnold paired him with the capable George Duke, a jazz musician with a deep appreciation of Brazilian music who was just beginning to branch out as a record producer. Raul also worked with George Duke in 1978 on the follow-up album, 'Don't Ask My Neighbors', although Duke is credited under the alias Dawilli Gonga. George Duke vacated the producer's chair for the third Capitol Album 'Til Tomorrow Comes' to be replaced by Arthur G. Wright, a prolific guitarist, songwriter, arranger and producer from Los Angeles whose credits ranged from Diana Ross to Linda Ronstadt. He surrounded Raul with some of LA's best session musicians including keyboardist Greg Phillinganes, saxophonist Ernie Fields, guitarist David T. Walker and drummers Ed Greene and James Gadson - and concocted a different musical backdrop for the trombonist; one that tapped more heavily into disco and R&B rather than jazz.
5013929956223

Details

Format: CD
Label: ROBINSONGS
Rel. Date: 01/13/2023
UPC: 5013929956223

Sweet Lucy / Don't Ask My / Til Tomorrow (Uk)
Artist: De Paul Souza
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Sweet Lucy
2. Wires
3. Wild and Shy
4. At Will
5. Banana Tree
6. A Song of Love
7. New Love (Cancao Do Nosso Amori)
8. Bottom Heat
9. Don't Ask My Neighbors
10. La la Song
11. Daisy Mae
12. Beauty and the Beast
13. Fortune
14. Overture
15. At the Concert
16. I Believe You
17. Jump Street
18. Raul de Souza ; Arthur Wright - 'Til Tomorrow Comes
19. Only When You Can
20. Fe-No-Me-Nol
21. Pleasurize
22. Up and at It
23. Everybody's Got to Dance to the Music
24. Self Sealing
25. Boogie Shoes
26. Sweet Lucy - Single Version
27. Daisy Mae - Single Version
28. Raul de Souza ; Arthur Wright - 'Til Tomorrow Comes - Single Version

More Info:

Three late 70s Capitol Albums by Raul de Souza: 'Sweet Lucy' (1977), 'Don't Ask My Neighbors' (1978) and 'Til Tomorrow Comes' (1979) available in a double CD package, with additional bonus tracks. Unquestionably a giant of Brazilian music, whose mastery of the trombone placed him in the instrument's elite. Featured tracks to check out on this package include 'Sweet Lucy', 'Overture', 'Daisy Mae', 'Jump Street' and 'Don't Ask My Neighbors' to name but five. With sleeve notes by MOJO and Record Collector journalist Charles Waring. Born Joao José Pereira de Souza in Rio de Janeiro on 23 August 1934, Raul de Souza played with the legendary Brazilian composer and bandleader Pixinguinha at the age of 17 in 1951 and, a year later, performed with Agostinho dos Santos, a popular singer who later had a role in the burgeoning bossa nova movement of the late 1950s. Encouraged by his friend percussionist Airto Moreira and his wife, singer Flora Purim, Raul left Brazil for the USA in the early 70s. In 1976, he contributed to an album by a US-based Latin fusion group called Caldera, which was released on Capitol Records and put him in the orbit of it's executive producer Larkin Arnold. For Raul's debut LP, 'Sweet Lucy', Arnold paired him with the capable George Duke, a jazz musician with a deep appreciation of Brazilian music who was just beginning to branch out as a record producer. Raul also worked with George Duke in 1978 on the follow-up album, 'Don't Ask My Neighbors', although Duke is credited under the alias Dawilli Gonga. George Duke vacated the producer's chair for the third Capitol Album 'Til Tomorrow Comes' to be replaced by Arthur G. Wright, a prolific guitarist, songwriter, arranger and producer from Los Angeles whose credits ranged from Diana Ross to Linda Ronstadt. He surrounded Raul with some of LA's best session musicians including keyboardist Greg Phillinganes, saxophonist Ernie Fields, guitarist David T. Walker and drummers Ed Greene and James Gadson - and concocted a different musical backdrop for the trombonist; one that tapped more heavily into disco and R&B rather than jazz.
back to top